Precious Jewels From Around The World

Every time I step out of my house, whether to explore a new country or a new place within my land, I mostly think about what my eyes can see. And, most of that is above the ground – the buildings and monuments, the streets, the mountains and valleys, the lakes and rivers, the trees, animals and the culture of the locals, and then, the sky. What I often overlook is what lies under the earth. I am not talking about tubers or roots or the exotic dishes that are made of those, but what lies further below – several feet under, formed by immense heat and pressure – precious stones.

Austria – Emerald Waters And Emerald Rings

The beautiful country of Austria is also a major producer of emerald.

The beautiful country of Austria is also a major producer of emerald.

When I went solo to Salzburg a couple of years ago, I was busy admiring the lovelock bridge that spans River Salzach, connecting the modern world full of gardens and courtyards to the Old Town paved with cobblestones. I gazed at the lime green grass carpeting the banks on either side of the emerald river and longed to hike on the moss-covered hills in the backdrop. But not once did I think about Austria’s prominence as an emerald producer and exporter to the world. Even my journeys back home yielded similar results…

Diamonds In Golconda?

Golconda (Hyderabad) is popular not only for its fort but also for diamond mining and trading.

Golconda (Hyderabad) is popular not only for its fort but also for diamond mining and trading.

I’ve lost count of the number of times I have visited Hyderabad – both when it was a part of Andhra Pradesh and after it became Telangana’s. I have even climbed all of the steps that lead to Golconda Fort, and spent a lot of money buying Hyderabadi pearls. It is only now that I see Golconda differently after my mum inquires why I never brought back any diamonds from this place that has one of the world’s most famous diamond mines.

“Czeching” Out Garnet

Czech Republic might be famous for Kafka, but it stores some of the world's best garnet, topaz and opal.

Czech Republic might be famous for Kafka, but it stores some of the world’s best garnet, topaz and opal.

3 years ago, I was exploring central Europe, and my journey had brought me to Prague – the capital of Czech Republic. Over days of checking out the most vibrant Old Town, its cathedrals, sailing over the Vltava river, being surprised over Kafka’s fame and buying copper rings, I discovered Czechia is also popular for its gemstones such as garnet, topaz and opal. But I asked myself how far and wide I’d have to travel to collect beautiful stones from different parts of the world. Could I not get all such precious stones from the comfort of my home? Would expensive gemstones always be too expensive for me to own? I’ve recently found an answer to my quest:-

Jewel On Fire – Gemstone Jewellery In Your Budget

Did you know Germany's Alps could have gemstones such as beryl, topaz and emeralds under them?

Did you know Germany’s Alps could have gemstones such as beryl, topaz and emeralds under them?

I came across the online jewellery store Jewel On Fire which lets you buy precious stone ornaments priced up to 90% lower than their retail cost. This is possible only because they cut out the middlemen and source jewellery directly from jewellery craftsmen and manufacturers. And their online presence means you can shop without having to spend a bomb on travel. They have a splendid collection of low-cost genuine diamond jewellery and those of other precious stones. I have a sweeter information for you! When you use my promo code “OINDRILADE” to make a purchase on their site, you get an additional discount on their already amazingly priced items! ūüôā

Won’t You Travel Differently Now?

It's not only Sri Lanka's lakes that are associated with aquamarine!

It’s not only Sri Lanka’s lakes that are associated with aquamarine!

When I told my mum about this, she was elated. She won’t have to worry about lugging heavy jewellery back from her trips now. And travel would only be about the sights and experiences, not the expenses associated with shopping of gemstones. I will again be able to visit Germany for its castles, and not think about beryl or topaz or emerald. I will again be able to enjoy the forests and lakes of Sri Lanka without hunting for good quality yet affordable aquamarine. “Aquamarine” would only make me think of the water bodies again, and not the stone on my ring finger.

Still, You Should Know…

Hungary's creamy white skies know that that this country has a lot of creamy opal stones as well.

Hungary’s creamy white skies know that that this country has a lot of creamy opal stones as well.

Even though you will mostly shop online, lounging in your sofa, it helps to know a little more about the things you buy. It is the stories behind each earring, pendant and bracelet that makes the gemstones more precious!

Do you ever wonder where each of your jewels come from?

Write your comments below! ūüôā

Follow me on Instagram, Facebook, Youtube and Twitter for more interesting facts and stories from around the world. Do share this article with your friends who are into precious stones!

St. Petersburg – A Scintillating City

Last year, my first international trip began with a week-long visit to Russia. We spent our¬†first few days in Moscow (read Glimpses of Moscow ‚Äď A Photo Essay) and took the Sapsan superfast train to St. Petersburg – the more European of the two cities.

The road to St. Petersburg is coloured with water and ice

The road to St. Petersburg is coloured with water and ice

Stepping into Sankt Peterburg

Travelling as we were in the winter, I expected the city to be a sullen, grey shadow of its summer-self. But “Sankt Peterburg” (as it is called in Russian), was out to surprise me with its colours and a strange warmth in the frozen climes.

Our home in this winter-city

Our home in this winter-city

A Taste of Russian Hospitality

I made this trip with my parents and little sister. My folks had been¬†wary of my travel planning skills, but they were delighted when I kept¬†revealing one wonder after another. Our place of stay (Soul Kitchen – more on that in another blogpost) in St. P was something they absolutely loved!¬†After all, I had booked us two private rooms at the best place in (possibly) all of Russia! ūüėÄ

The evening we entered the city, we chatted with our friendly hosts and got some nice recommendations on places to see. We had a quick dinner at a nearby cafe and slept early for the next day was going to be an exciting one! ūüôā

Saint Isaac's Cathedral - the largest orthodox basilica in the world

Saint Isaac’s Cathedral – the largest orthodox basilica in the world

Saint Isaac’s Cathedral

The icy winds could do nothing to stop us from leaving our temperature controlled haven. We strutted out in our boots and overcoats and followed the map to our first stop –¬†Isaakievskiy Sobor. More commonly known as Saint Isaac’s Cathedral, this is the fourth largest cathedral in the world. You can climb a spiral staircase to reach the roof of this building, from where you shall¬†have¬†a panoramic view of the entire city.

Bejeweled Easter eggs with a replica of Isaakievskiy Sobor inside

Bejeweled Easter eggs with a replica of Isaakievskiy Sobor inside

The cathedral has opulent interiors which take at least an hour to admire. There are also shopping kiosks for those looking for good quality amber and ornate trinkets to take back home. This cathedral deserves a blogpost of its own, so I will reveal more about this Sobor in that article.

A couple dressed in traditional royal attire glides past the Kazan Cathedral

A couple dressed in traditional royal attire glides past the Kazan Cathedral

Kazan Cathedral

Before you read about the cathedral, you must be aware of¬†‘Our Lady of Kazan’. She is a venerated icon, often regarded as Virgin Mary, and the guardian of the Russian city of Kazan. The cathedral, also known as¬†Kazanskiy Kafedralniy Sobor, is inspired by the St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Many events of political importance have transpired inside this semicircular splendour. It is mandatory for every woman to cover her head before she enters, as a mark of respect for Our Lady of Kazan. It’s unfortunate that photography is prohibited inside, I cannot show you¬†the palatial and lavish interiors.

The Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood

The Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood

The Church on Spilled Blood

The Church on Spilled Blood is so named because it is here that Alexander II (who happened to be the Emperor of Russia, the King of Poland and the Grand Duke of Finland), was assassinated with grenades. The church stands beside the Griboedov Canal and has mosaic interiors to match the magnificence of its elaborate exterior.

Lunch at MarketPlace - a delightful restaurant

Lunch at MarketPlace – a delightful vegetarian-friendly restaurant

A Marketplace of Happiness

We lunched at a bright, cheerful restaurant called MarketPlace. This cafe is highly recommended for its artisanal breads, fresh vegetables and a wide selection of Russian dishes. The ambiance is warm and welcoming, and the decor, homely, with pots and pans suspended from the ceiling.

On a side note, I have been so impressed by Russian food and places to eat that I’m going to write an exclusive guide¬†to eating in this country.

River Neva refuses to freeze in the sub-zero temperatures

River Neva refuses to freeze in the sub-zero temperatures

The Other Side of Neva

River Neva is the third largest river in Europe and has a number of bridges connecting its banks. From Nevsky Prospekt, one can see the Palace Quay and the Winter Palace on the other side of the deep blue waters. The river itself is home to wild ducks and fresh water fishes. It is difficult to describe what a walk along the Palace Embankment feels like. Pushkin puts it much better in this poem from his novel, Eugene Onegin:-

Filled with his heart’s regrets, and leaning
Against the rampart’s granite shelf,
Eugene stood lost in pensive dreaming
(As once some poet drew himself).
The night grew still… with silence falling;
Only the sound of sentries calling,
Or suddenly from Million Street
Some distant droshky’s rumbling beat;
Or floating on a drowsy river,
A lonely boat would sail along,
While far away some rousing song
Or plaintive horn would make us shiver.
But sweeter still, amid such nights,
Are Tasso’s octaves’ soaring flights.

The Palace Square with the Alexander Column at its centre

The Palace Square with the Alexander Column at its centre

The Palace Square

The Palace Square is an expansive open space with the Alexander Column as its focal point. The column was constructed to commemorate¬†Russia’s victory over France in the 19th century. This square has seen a lot of history – revolutions and bloodshed. But today, it’s a place for teenagers to skateboard and toddlers to scamper around; a place where lovers walk holding hands and the romantics take horse-carriage rides.

The Russian tricolour flutters atop the Winter Palace

The Russian tricolour flutters atop the Winter Palace

The Winter Palace

Once upon a time, this green palace would house the Russian royal family. Today, it forms a part of the Hermitage Museum which has a colossal collection of European art and antiquities spread across more than a hundred rooms!¬†It is said that to properly see every room, one needs an entire month. It is awful that we only had the better part of an afternoon ūüôĀ

An exquisitely designed chandelier hangs from the ornate ceiling of the Hermitage Museum

An exquisitely designed chandelier hangs from the ornate ceiling of the Hermitage Museum

The palace and museum complex is one of the most grandiose I have ever seen in my life. There are throne rooms that have been privy to coronations, reception rooms that have held many spectacular balls, guest suites and nurseries, apartments for the Tsar and the Empress, and umpteen private rooms, apart from the halls that housed arms and gilt.

My fingers are already itching to write another post specifically for the Hermitage complex. But right¬†now, I must take you across the Palace Bridge to another spectacle on the other side. ūüôā

Peter and Paul Fortress on the Zayachy Island

Peter and Paul Fortress on the Zayachy Island

Peter and Paul Fortress

This fortress was built by Peter the Great (the ruler of the Russian Empire) on Zayachy Ostrov or Hare Island to protect the city of St. Petersburg from a potential Swedish attack. The fortress served a dual purpose of being a military base and prison for high-profile inmates.

There is also the imposing Peter and Paul Cathedral in the fortress complex which has a gilded spire that makes it the tallest Orthodox church in the world. The complex has an array of museums with separate entry fee, canon exhibits and interactive statues for photo-ops.

Someday, I shall rule from my iron throne :-P

Someday, I shall rule from my iron throne ūüėõ

I was in St. P for less than 3 days but I got glimpses of history spanning hundreds of years. Some trips are too short to search for answers to all the questions we have. I know in my heart that I will return to Russia someday.

Glimpses of Moscow – A Photo Essay

Last month was a magical whirlwind for me. I quit my job, romanced¬†Russia for a week, and returned to India to start at a new workplace… with a promise to return to my new found love. I have plenty of untold stories lined up for you in a series of posts dedicated to Moscow and St. Petersburg. Here is a teaser of all that awaits you… a glimpse of the capital city of Moscow:-

Cathedral of Saint Basil – A Beauty since 1561

The Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed

The Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed

Legend has it that the then Tsar of Russia, Ivan the Terrible, asked the architect of this world famous landmark if he could build such a beautiful structure again. To that,¬†Postnik Yakovlev, the architect, replied, “I will design a hundred such magnificent buildings at your command, my Lord!” Ivan promptly ordered Postnik to be blinded, so there would not be anything like St. Basil’s Cathedral elsewhere in the world.

GUM Mall – Where Heritage meets Contemporary

The enchanting interiors of Gum Mall

The enchanting interiors of Gum Mall

Located at Red Square – the city centre of Moscow, GUM has been in existence for over 120 years. The heritage architecture of the building and the old-style decor on the exterior of the facade will not let you believe that a modern shopping centre flourishes inside!

Old Arbat Street – A Fine Example of Starting Over after all has been Destroyed

A local in the traditional Russian attire on Old Arbat Street

A local in the traditional Russian attire on Old Arbat Street

A posh locality in Moscow, the 600-year old Arbat Street was gutted in a catastrophic fire in 1812. After it was rebuilt, this august street has been home to famous Russian writers, Pushkin being one of them. This street is now a popular shopping area for tourists looking for souvenirs.

Moskva – The River that gave Moscow its Name

The glittering Moscva River at night

The glittering Moskva River at night

The Moskva river flows under majestic bridges that link various parts of this city. Book a cruise and watch Moscow from one bank to another as you float across the city that borrowed its name from the eponymous river. You cannot miss the dazzling Radisson Royal Hotel on your way!

Kremlin and the Icons that make up the Complex

A slice of Red Square

A slice of Red Square – State Historical Museum (centre) and Kazan Cathedral (right)

The Moscow Kremlin is a¬†triangular enclosure that sits on Red Square and houses the President of Russia. It is surrounded by famous monuments – St. Basil’s Cathedral, Lenin’s Mausoleum, the State Historical Museum, Kazan Cathedral, GUM Mall, Iberian Gate and Chapel, Moscow City Hall, and several other prominent cathedrals.

Mementos that will remind you of your Moments in Moscow

Matryoshka dolls gathered in a huddle

Matryoshka dolls gathered in a huddle

Moscow is a souvenir-collector’s¬†paradise.¬†Every little item of prominence is steeped in history and some cultural importance in Russia. The ever-so-popular matryoshka dolls that open up to reveal smaller dolls inside them are symbols of life and womanhood. The doll-in-doll mechanism highlights how every woman has found her life through another – her mother, and how this chain is endless. [Stay tuned for my post on shopping in Russia for some tips and more pictures of all the wonderful things you can buy!]

Tsaritsyno – A Castle in the Snow

Tsaritsyno Castle on a bed of fresh snow

Tsaritsyno Castle on a bed of fresh snow

On the outskirts of Moscow hides the dreamy castle of Tsaritsyno. Away from the madding crowds, this secret is known to few travellers. The palace is surrounded by a forest on one side and lakes and gardens on the other. You will need to come out of your comfort zone to get a real feel of Russia!

Golubtsy – Russia’s Love-Letter to your Palate

Golubtsy - a gastronomical delight!

Golubtsy – a gastronomical delight!

Russia has many gastronomical surprises for you, especially if you are vegetarian (as I am). From flavourful¬†borscht to piroshki stuffed with all things delightful, Russia has a treasure trove of exotic and traditional dishes for you. Your tastebuds¬†will thank you for the variety and bursts of flavour! [Don’t miss the exclusive culinary edition coming soon on my blog!]

Domes that Colour the Skies

The Church of the Holy Trinity at the Borisovo Ponds

The Church of the Holy Trinity at the Borisovo Ponds

Moscow has a number of beautiful churches, chapels and cathedrals. The tranquil atmosphere aside, these structures have intriguing architectures. The spires and domes are intricately carved and painted in a riot of colours. The Holy Trinity Church on the way to Domodedovo International Airport looks spectacular with its blue domes and golden emblems.

4 Levels of Metro – What Keeps this City Moving!

Muscovites taking the metro to work

Muscovites taking the metro to work

Moscow has an extensive metro circuit that extends across 4 levels and connects all of this ‘metro’politan city. The metro-circuits were¬†built in circles, tracing the roads that run above them. The roads were constructed in rings around the city centre, and a new ‘ring’ was added whenever the need was felt to expand the city. This is also why the Mayor of Moscow is sometimes called Lord of the ‘Rings’. ūüėČ

This is the end of today’s post, but the beginning of a journey you all have just embarked on with me. Let me hear all your questions and suggestions for the posts to come! If you are planning a trip to Russia, let me know if you want me to touch on¬†anything specific. I want this virtual¬†globe-trot to benefit you just as much as it titillates you!